Apple, Google or Microsoft? How to match cloud storage to your computers – and cut costs

The weather prediction for your next phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop includes a choice of clouds, not just a possibility of them. Which cloud-storage service will you employ to back up your files, for example?

“None” is the incorrect response. Any device that will leave your house need a backup mechanism that does not rely on you remembering to plug it into a hard drive or another computer when you return.

Furthermore, cloud storage makes it much easier to access your most important information from any device.

However, unless you live in Apple’s orbit, you’ll have to select between cloud services that work better on certain devices than others.

Here are your Apple, Google, and Microsoft options, along with annual costs:

Apple’s iCloud+ offers 5 GB of free storage, after which you can upgrade to 50 GB for $11.88/year, 200 GB for $35.88/year, or 2 terabytes for $119.88/year;

Google One offers 15 GB for free, then 100 GB for $19.99/year, 200 GB for $29.99/year, and 2 TB for $99.99/year; Microsoft’s OneDrive offers 5 GB for free, followed by 100 GB for $2

iCloud+ enables for the simplest backup on Macs, iPhones, and iPads, and now includes extra privacy tools like iCloud Private Relay to cloak your browsing and Hide My Email to establish random email names that forward to your actual email.

On Windows, OneDrive offers both basic backup of your important data folders and the added benefit of Microsoft Office programmers.

Google’s backup service lacks the add-ons that Apple and Microsoft provide, but it’s your only option if your Gmail inbox has outgrown your capacity to keep it under the 15 GB limit.

Aside from those three, you can buy cloud storage from Dropbox, which costs $119.88 per year for 2 TB, and Amazon Prime customers get unlimited Amazon Photos storage;

But, those third-party services lack interoperability with key computing platforms.

My advise is to base your cloud decision on the computer that requires the most internet backup — that is, the machine that spends the most time away from home and contains the most sensitive data.

n my instance, that device is a Windows 10 HP laptop, therefore I pay for OneDrive to sync its documents, images, and music.

My other piece of advise is to avoid paying full price for cloud storage if at all possible. Credit card cash-back deals, such as a targeted American Express 20% off Google One promotion, can help you save money,

But you can also buy Apple and Google gift cards, which are good for their respective services

.

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