Smartphone apps for hearing loss

Smartphone apps for hearing loss

Smartphones have given us a level of independence and communication access that we could not have imagined in the not-so-distant past.

While I tested out the majority of these programmes, I also relied on developer descriptions and internet reviewer input.

Furthermore, not all applications are accessible for both iOS (the operating system used on iPhones and iPads) and Android (the operating system I use on my phone), and while many are free or low-cost, both are always evolving, as does technology itself.

To find the most recent versions of these programmes, look them up online by name.

Apps are available in the App Store for iPhones and iPads, and the Google Play Store for Android devices.

Apps for speech-to-text

One of the apps that transcribes spoken audio into text on your smartphone is Google’s Live Transcribe (Android only).

This programme takes things a step further by reporting on many of the background sounds you hear, as well as their volume in relation to the voice it is transcribing.

It supports 80 languages and can preserve a chat transcript for up to three days. When you use it with your favourite TV show,

you’ll notice that it’s considerably faster and more accurate than the show’s captions. Other choices include Speechy (iOS), which transforms voice to text while simultaneously translating

it into another language, and Otter.ai (iOS & Android), which can be used with Zoom to transcribe meetings—or any event with numerous speakers, such as a dining table.

Personal amplification devices (‘pocket talkers’)

One of the apps that transcribes spoken audio into text on your smartphone is Google’s Live Transcribe (Android only).

This programme takes things a step further by reporting on many of the background sounds you hear, as well as their volume in relation to the voice it is transcribing.

It supports 80 languages and can preserve a chat transcript for up to three days. When you use it with your favourite TV show,

you’ll notice that it’s considerably faster and more accurate than the show’s captions.

Other choices include Speechy (iOS), which transforms voice to text while simultaneously translating it into another language, and Otter.ai (iOS & Android), which can be used with Zoom to transcribe meetings—or any event with numerous speakers, such as a dining table.

Sound level meters

It’s too loud if you have to yell at your friend from an arm’s length away in order to be heard. These applications allow you use a number of sound level metres to monitor decibel levels.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health teamed up with EA LAB to develop the NIOSH Sound Level Meter (iOS), which can be used at work or at home.

SoundPrint (iOS & Android) is a sound level metre that also allows you to contribute the decibel measurement of the venue in order to crowdsource a Quiet List of less loud restaurants and pubs in major U.S. cities.

When putting in a measurement, you may optionally specify whether it is for indoor or outdoor eating.

Streaming audio

The latest entrant in the race for assistive listening technologies in public spaces is audio streaming through WiFi.

The hitch is that each location may necessitate the use of a distinct smartphone app.

MYE Fitness Entertainment is available in a number of popular health club smartphone applications, including those from Gold’s Gym, Planet Fitness, and 24 Hour Fitness, among others.

It might also be the TV-listening software used in sports pubs. To hear the streaming audio, connect your hearing aids to Bluetooth or utilise the hearing aid T-coils and a neckloop.

Tunity allows users to listen to live audio from televisions that have been muted.

Tunity recognises a live video feed and its exact time using unique deep learning and computer vision technology, synchronising the audio with the user’s mobile device.

People utilise it at pubs, restaurants, gyms, waiting rooms, airports, and even their own homes. With your smartphone, you can listen.

Vaishabh Jalmi
I am a technologist, an electronics engineer, and a writer with a keen interest in the latest developments in technology, design, and engineering. I have an engineering degree in electronics from one of the top universities in India. My experience spans different domains of information technology including hardware, software, embedded systems, and networking. I have built my career on this passion for innovation by working at companies like Intel Corporation, General Electric Company (GE), Cisco Systems, Inc., PTC India Private Limited, Teamwork Software Ltd., etc. As a tech writer, I have written for some reputed publications like MakeUseOf and TheNextWeb. This has helped me hone my writing skills while also making it easier to understand complex topics related to technology.